Wikipedia

Life insurance – Wikipedia

Life insurance (or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations) is a contract between an insurance policy holder and an insurer or assurer, where the insurer promises to pay a designated beneficiary a sum of money (the benefit) in exchange for a premium, upon the death of an insured person (often the policy holder). Depending on the contract, other events such as terminal illness or critical illness can also trigger payment. The policy holder typically pays a premium, either regularly or as one lump sum. Other expenses, such as funeral expenses, can also be included in the benefits.

Life policies are legal contracts and the terms of the contract describe the limitations of the insured events. Specific exclusions are often written into the contract to limit the liability of the insurer; common examples are claims relating to suicide, fraud, war, riot, and civil commotion.

Modern life insurance bears

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Entrepreneur (magazine) – Wikipedia

Entrepreneur is an American magazine and website that carries news stories about entrepreneurship, small business management, and business. The magazine was first published in 1977.[2][3] It is published by Entrepreneur Media Inc., headquartered in Irvine, California.[4] The magazine publishes 10 issues annually, available through subscription and on newsstands. It is published under license internationally in Mexico, Russia, India, Hungary, the Philippines, South Africa, and others.[5] Its editor-in-chief is Jason Feifer and its owner is Peter Shea.[6]

History[edit]

Every year since 1979, Entrepreneur has published a list of its top 500 franchise companies based on a submission and review process.[7] The magazine also published many other lists and awards.

In 1996, the magazine launched its website, Entrepreneur.com, which expanded to include features, contests and other publications and spin-offs.[8]

Spin-offs[edit]

Entrepreneur publishes the Entrepreneur StartUps magazine, available through

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Financial services – Wikipedia

Financial services are the economic services provided by the finance industry, which encompasses a broad range of businesses that manage money, including credit unions, banks, credit-card companies, insurance companies, accountancy companies, consumer-finance companies, stock brokerages, investment funds, individual managers and some government-sponsored enterprises.[1] Financial services companies are present in all economically developed geographic locations and tend to cluster in local, national, regional and international financial centers such as London, New York City, and Tokyo.

History[edit]

Change in access to a financial account or services between 2005 and 2014 by country[2]

The term “financial services” became more prevalent in the United States partly as a result of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of the late 1990s, which enabled different types of companies operating in the U.S. financial services industry at that time to merge.[3]

Companies usually have two distinct approaches to this new type of business. One

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Finance Commission – Wikipedia

The Finance Commission (IAST: Vitta Āyoga) was established by the President of India in 1951 under Article 280 of the Indian Constitution. It was formed to define the financial relations between the central government of India and the individual state governments. The Finance Commission (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act, 1951 additionally defines the terms of qualification, appointment and disqualification, the term, eligibility and powers of the Finance Commission.[1] As per the Constitution, the Commission is appointed every five years and consists of a chairman and four other members.

Since the institution of the First Finance Commission, stark changes in the macroeconomic situation of the Indian economy have led to major changes in the Finance Commission’s recommendations over the years.

There have been fifteen commissions to date. The most recent was constituted in 2017 and is chaired by N. K.Singh, a former member of the Planning Commission.[2][3][4][5]

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Business administration – Wikipedia

Process of managing a business or a non-profit organization

Business administration (also known as business management) is the administration of a business. It includes all aspects of overseeing and supervising business operations. From the point of view of management and leadership, it also covers fields that include accounting, finance, project management and marketing.

Overview[edit]

The administration of a business includes the performance or management of business operations and decision-making, as well as the efficient organization of people and other resources to direct activities towards common goals and objectives. In general, “administration” refers to the broader management function, including the associated finance, personnel and MIS services.

Administration can refer to the bureaucratic or operational performance of routine office tasks,[citation needed] usually internally oriented and reactive rather than proactive. Administrators, broadly speaking, engage in a common set of functions to meet an organization’s goals. Henri

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Business intelligence software – Wikipedia

Business intelligence software is a type of application software designed to retrieve, analyze, transform and report data for business intelligence. The applications generally read data that has been previously stored, often – though not necessarily – in a data warehouse or data mart.

History[edit]

Development of business intelligence software[edit]

The first comprehensive business intelligence systems were developed by IBM and Siebel (currently acquired by Oracle) in the period between 1970 and 1990.[1][2] At the same time, small developer teams were emerging with attractive ideas, and pushing out some of the products companies still use nowadays.[3]

In 1988, specialists and vendors organized a Multiway Data Analysis Consortium in Rome, where they considered making data management and analytics more efficient, and foremost available to smaller and financially restricted businesses. By 2000, there were many professional reporting systems and analytic programs, some owned by

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List of entrepreneurs – Wikipedia

Wikipedia list article

This is a list of entrepreneurs by century. An entrepreneur is an owner or manager of a business enterprise who makes money through risk and/or initiative.[1] This list includes notable entrepreneurs.

17th-century entrepreneurs[edit]

  • Regina Basilier (1572-1631), Swedish-German banker, trader and investor
  • Birgitta Durell (1619-1683), Dutch-Swedish manufactor-industrialist
  • Louis De Geer (1587–1652), Walloon-born Dutch-Swedish businessman and industrialist; active mainly in the Dutch Republic and Sweden
  • Isaac Le Maire (ca.1558-1624), Walloon-born Dutch businessman and investor; active mainly in the Dutch Republic
  • Johan Palmstruch (1611-1671), Latvian-born Dutch-Swedish businessman, investor, and financial innovator; active mainly in the Dutch Republic and Sweden
  • Pierre-Paul Riquet (1609-1680), French entrepreneur, creator of the Canal du Midi

18th-century entrepreneurs[edit]

19th-century entrepreneurs[edit]

  • John Jacob Astor (real estate), USA
  • Augusta Björkenstam (transportation), Sweden
  • Andrew Carnegie (steel), Pittsburgh, USA and Scotland
  • James Buchanan Duke (tobacco), USA
  • Thomas Alva Edison (film,
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Business interruption insurance – Wikipedia

Business interruption insurance (also known as business income insurance) is a type of insurance that covers the loss of income that a business suffers after a disaster. The income loss covered may be due to disaster-related closing of the business facility or due to the rebuilding process after a disaster.

It differs from property insurance in that a property insurance policy only covers the physical damage to the business, while the additional coverage allotted by the business interruption policy covers the profits that would have been earned. This extra policy provision is applicable to all types of businesses, as it is designed to put a business in the same financial position it would have been in if no loss had occurred.[1]

This type of coverage can be added onto the business’ property insurance policy or comprehensive package policy such as a business owner’s policy (BOP) or as part

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Inteligencia empresarial – Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre

Business-inteligence-800x493.jpg

Se denomina inteligencia empresarial, inteligencia de negocios, inteligencia comercial o BI (del inglés business intelligence), al conjunto de estrategias, aplicaciones, datos, productos, tecnologías y arquitectura técnicas, los cuales están enfocados a la administración y creación de conocimiento sobre el medio, a través del análisis de los datos existentes en una organización o empresa.[1][2]

Definición[editar]

El término inteligencia empresarial se refiere al uso de datos en una empresa para facilitar la toma de decisiones. Abarca la comprensión del funcionamiento actual de la empresa, bien como la anticipación de acontecimientos futuros, con el objetivo de ofrecer conocimientos para respaldar las decisiones empresariales.

Las herramientas de inteligencia se basan en la utilización de un sistema de información de inteligencia que se forma con distintos datos extraídos de la producción, con información relacionada con la empresa o sus ámbitos, y

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Line of business – Wikipedia

Line of business (LOB) is a general term which refers to a product or a set of related products that serve a particular customer transaction or business need.
In some industry sectors, like insurance, “line of business” also has a regulatory and accounting definition to meet a statutory set of insurance policies. It may or may not be a strategically relevant business unit.

“Line of business” often refers to an internal corporate business unit, whereas the term “industry” refers to an external view that includes all competitors competing in a similar market. A line of business will often examine its position within an industry using a Porter five forces analysis (or other industry-analysis method) and other relevant industry information.

Computer applications[edit]

In the context of computing, a “line-of-business application” is one of the set of critical computer applications perceived as vital to running an enterprise.

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