Business Plan Template (US) | LawDepot

While Business Plans may vary depending on the size and purpose of a business, they

While Business Plans may vary depending on the size and purpose of a business, they typically
include the following information.

Executive Summary

This portion of the plan introduces and summarizes your
company. Generally, it includes an overview of your company’s management structure (sole
proprietorship, partnership, corporation, Limited Liability Company, etc.), products or
services, company goals, current finances, and marketing strategies.
In short, your executive summary pitches your proposal to potential investors.

Business Description and Mission Statement

This is a brief rundown of your
business’s history, ownership, and purpose. A mission statement, also called a vision statement,
outlines who your target market and primary customers are, the area you serve (local, national,
or international), and the products and/or services that your business produces.

Product or Service

This section describes the product or service that your
business sells. The product description should highlight its unique features, any patents you
may have, and ideas for future products that you want to develop.

Marketing Strategy

Your marketing strategy is how you plan to get your product
or service in front of customers. This is where you can include advertising and promotional
ideas, as well as your plan for selling your product or service (e.g. in a brick-and-mortar
store or ecommerce website).

Competitors Analysis

This section describes your competition and how you intend
to challenge their current strategies. When you analyze potential competitors, consider things
like their establishment in the market you are targeting and how you can distinguish your
company from them in terms of pricing, product or service quality, and customer support.

SWOT

SWOT is an acronym for “Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and
Threats.” A SWOT analysis evaluates these specific aspects of your business and helps you
identify what your business is (or will be) good at and where you can improve. A SWOT analysis
is a useful tool when deciding if your business is worth starting, or if you need to make
significant changes to your overall business strategy.

Operations Overview

An operations overview provides a glimpse into the daily
operations of your business, including the management and staffing structure, human resources
plan, physical operational facility, and production methods (such as quotas or manufacturing
details).

Financial Plan

Your financial plan may include your company’s income (profit
and loss) statements. It can also encompass your capital requirements if you are pitching your
ideas to investors. In that case, describe the investment amount you require and how you plan to
repay this capital in a repayment plan.

Strengths: List the strengths that your business has and how you can build on them. For instance, you could list if you sell a unique product that nobody else does, if you own or hold any patents, if you’re opening in an ideal location, or if you believe that you’re providing a product of exceptional quality and price.
							Weaknesses: List your business’s weaknesses and how you can improve them. Some examples include potential production delays, use of outdated technology, opening in a poor location, lack of reputation, and limited marketing knowledge.
							Opportunities: List your business’s opportunities and how you can benefit from them; for example, if you expect your product to be in high demand due to emerging trends, if you have the perfect marketing idea, or you are planning on adding more products to your repertoire in the future. 
							Threats: List potential threats to your business’s success and what you can do about them. For instance, perhaps a new competitor is planning to enter the market at the same time as you, the suppliers that you want to work with haven’t been dependable in the past, or local laws and/or taxes could negatively affect your business.
							Strengths: List the strengths that your business has and how you can build on them. For instance, you could list if you sell a unique product that nobody else does, if you own or hold any patents, if you’re opening in an ideal location, or if you believe that you’re providing a product of exceptional quality and price.
							Weaknesses: List your business’s weaknesses and how you can improve them. Some examples include potential production delays, use of outdated technology, opening in a poor location, lack of reputation, and limited marketing knowledge.
							Opportunities: List your business’s opportunities and how you can benefit from them; for example, if you expect your product to be in high demand due to emerging trends, if you have the perfect marketing idea, or you are planning on adding more products to your repertoire in the future. 
							Threats: List potential threats to your business’s success and what you can do about them. For instance, perhaps a new competitor is planning to enter the market at the same time as you, the suppliers that you want to work with haven’t been dependable in the past, or local laws and/or taxes could negatively affect your business.

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